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Hi all. I find the steering on the 2002 Elantra GT is surprisingly soft for a small car, let alone a "sporty" car. Other small cars I've driven (Sentra, Protege) have a much tighter steering feel, more responsive, and fewer turns lock-to-lock. The steering on the Elantra actually reminds me somewhat of my dad's old 1970 Cutlass Supreme, except that the Elantra steering stays on-center much better.

Is there any easy way (i.e., reprogramming) to adjust the steering to get a crisper feel? Or does that require an overhaul of the entire steering mechanism?

Thanks.

-- Dave
 

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SkepticDave said:
Hi all. I find the steering on the 2002 Elantra GT is surprisingly soft for a small car, let alone a "sporty" car. Other small cars I've driven (Sentra, Protege) have a much tighter steering feel, more responsive, and fewer turns lock-to-lock. The steering on the Elantra actually reminds me somewhat of my dad's old 1970 Cutlass Supreme, except that the Elantra steering stays on-center much better.

Is there any easy way (i.e., reprogramming) to adjust the steering to get a crisper feel? Or does that require an overhaul of the entire steering mechanism?

Thanks.

-- Dave
there can be a multitude of factors for poor steering, but the most common

1. low tire pressure
2. bad/cheap quality tires
3. worn out bushings
4. worn struts
5. Inncorrect alignment

The steering isnt electronically controlled by a computer, reprogramming is out of the question. I suggest try looking at the items listed above first, before doing anything drastic.

Gregster

If anything, a strut tower bar can add the need ridigity you need.
 

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I've found the steering in my 2004 to be a little soft also. Taking some turns at a moderate speed seems to make the front end feel like it is floating and not giving a smooth feeling. If that makes sense. Do you think the strut tower bar would make a difference? My car has not been modded in any way it is still stock. Thanks
 

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It's the Michelins, they are the worst tires I've ever owned. While the suspension is quite soft on Elantras, most of the front end wiggle is found in the sidewall of these terrible tires. Upgrading the tires would help, moving up to larger diameter wheels and lower profile tires would really help.
 

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GTblue1 said:
I've found the steering in my 2004 to be a little soft also. Taking some turns at a moderate speed seems to make the front end feel like it is floating and not giving a smooth feeling. If that makes sense. Do you think the strut tower bar would make a difference? My car has not been modded in any way it is still stock. Thanks
i dont see why not, a strut bar increases structural ridigity and reduces body flex.

Gregster
 

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It'll help, but I have the Evo Fusion front strut brace and while it does stiffen up the handling a bit, the car still handles like a Lincoln. Of course I'm comparing it to my Accent GSi that was running Falken Azenis Sports, so the handling of the Elantra seems really way too soft! The best upgrade to increase the handling and the turning feel is the Tib rear sway bar, of course I haven't done that myself yet, I probably should.
 

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Believe it or not, the 19.2mm rear anti-sway bar will make a big difference. A lot of the softness you feel in the steering is actually caused by the rear-end of the car swinging & swaying back in forth like a dog wagging its tail -- the thicker anti-sway bar will help tie it down.

And as already mentioned the soft sidewalls in the stock Michelin's play a big part in the sloppy feel. A tire with a stiffer sidewall will make a world of difference -- oh how I miss my Z-rated tires, lol. Get 16 or 17" wheels and you'll have plenty of choices for performance tires. ;)

Lastly, if you're still not satisfied you could have work done on your rack-and-pinion system. You could save some money if you were to remove it yourself. Some shops can rebuild them for around $250. You can have them modify it so you'll have a tighter ratio -- 2 turns lock to lock is really nice. And then you'd have to re-install it... I'm not sure how much it would be if you let them do the uninstall and install.
 

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Thanks for the replies. Theyn all help. I was starting ti think I was just being anal about it. But it might also be my last 3 cars were an Accord, Integra and an older RX-7.
 

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SWortham said:
Believe it or not, the 19.2mm rear anti-sway bar will make a big difference. A lot of the softness you feel in the steering is actually caused by the rear-end of the car swinging & swaying back in forth like a dog wagging its tail -- the thicker anti-sway bar will help tie it down.
Absolutely! The difference is night and day. A strut tower bar might make a barely perceptible difference, but for around the same price, the sway bar makes a difference you can really feel immediately. The car corners MUCH flatter and the steering feels much more precise.

I'm looking into ways to reduce the steering boost and restore some of the feeling to the steering. I've found one device that looks promising, but I'm a bit leery of cutting into hoses that carry over 1200 PSI. It seems like custom steering lines on the high pressure side are in order.

http://www.heidts.com/images/art2.pdf
 

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I'm looking into ways to reduce the steering boost and restore some of the feeling to the steering. I've found one device that looks promising, but I'm a bit leery of cutting into hoses that carry over 1200 PSI. It seems like custom steering lines on the high pressure side are in order.

http://www.heidts.com/images/art2.pdf[/QUOTE]

So you want to reduce the effect of the power steering pump? Looks like a possiblity, but wouldn't this device put extra strain on the pump? It's like making it pump through a clogged line. As far as hoses, I'd get some good hydraulic lines made up at a truck-stop/repair facility. I've seen hoses go at much less than 1200, don't try splicing this thing in to home-made hoses.
 

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"So you want to reduce the effect of the power steering pump?"

That's the plan. Reducing the boost should provide more feedback.

"Looks like a possiblity, but wouldn't this device put extra strain on the pump? It's like making it pump through a clogged line."

Actually, it's quite the opposite. It reduces the pressure by bleeding off high pressure fluid to the return line. More fluid flows, but less pressure in the line means less work for the pump.

"As far as hoses, I'd get some good hydraulic lines made up at a truck-stop/repair facility. I've seen hoses go at much less than 1200, don't try splicing this thing in to home-made hoses."

Agreed. I have no intention of screwing around.
 
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